Bird Families

The giant cuckoo is a bird, the largest representative of the cuckoo family and nesting parasites in general

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Distribution - nests in the north and east of Australia, winters from New Guinea to Celebes. Habitat - sparse and swampy forests.

Appearance

The size of an adult bird is 58-65 cm. With its massive constitution and large curved beak, this bird rather resembles a toucan than a cuckoo. They keep singly or in small flocks in tree crowns.

Structural features

The eyes are brown, the ring around the eyes is purple-red, the beak is yellowish-horny, the legs are olive-brown. The female differs from the male in a slightly smaller size.

Reproduction

There is no detailed information about breeding yet, but it can still be assumed that the gigantic cuckoo also entrusts its eggs to other people's parents.

Lifestyle

They are most active at dawn and in the pre-dusk time, but sometimes they feed at night, announcing the surroundings with their extremely loud cries. The gigantic cuckoo tosses its eggs into the nests of real crows and flutist crows Strepera graculina At the same time, the female cuckoo often lays 2 or even more of her eggs in one tez-do at once. After hatching, the cuckoo does not try to throw out other chicks, but at the same time intercepts the lion's share of food.

Food

They feed mainly on fruits, especially ripe figs. They also eat large insects.

Giant cuckoo and man

In the South Asian islands and in Polynesia, there are cuckoos, which are called small toucan cuckoos.

Gigantic cuckoo

The giant cuckoo is a bird, the largest representative of the family of cuckoo and nesting parasites in general. It does not hatch the offspring on its own, instead it throws eggs into the nests of corvids and other large Australian Passerines and birds of prey. Breeds in Australia, New Guinea, Sulawesi, Lesser Sunda Islands and Bismarck Archipelago. In Australia it is a migratory bird, in the rest of its range it is a nomadic bird. It feeds on the fruits of figs and other woody plants, as well as insects. In some places it is a numerous species.

4. Nutrition

Like related koels, the diet is based on the soft fruits of woody plants, primarily figs, mistletoe, introduced black mulberry, trees of the Belfry family, as well as eucalyptus seeds. Most of the animal feeds are insects - beetles, stick insects, butterflies, grasshoppers. It occasionally feeds on eggs and chicks of small birds such as the bullfinch jay Struthidea cinerea, the Australian grallina Grallina cyanoleuca and the black-capped manorina Manorina melanocephala. The diet of chicks completely depends on the feeding specialization of the adoptive parents - for example, in the Strepera raven flutists, it consists of fruits, in corvids, it consists of insects and carrion. Birds feed in flocks of up to 20 birds in tree crowns, occasionally forming mixed associations with fig orioles or larvaeaters.

5. Reproduction

Breeds in spring and summer corresponding to autumn and winter months in the northern hemisphere, but more precise egg-laying time varies from region to region. One of the mating manifestations of the male is the so-called demonstrative feeding, in which he presents a large insect to the female. The female does not incubate eggs on her own, but lays one or two in the nests of other large songbirds, while often destroying the master's clutch. The appearance of the cuckoo eggs imitates the eggs of the chosen prey - they can be colored bluish-green, clay, pinkish-gray or dull white with the same varied speckling. Newborn cuckoo chicks do not push their real parents out of the nest, but due to their rapid growth and aggressive behavior, they do not give them access to the food they bring. As observations show, at the age of one week, the cuckoo chick no longer has other rivals. After 17 - 24 he begins to fly, but for about a month he is fed by his foster parents before he becomes completely independent.

On Sulawesi, the cuckoo often falls prey to the lesser crow, on the islands of Flores and Sumba, the flores raven and large-billed crow, and in New Britain, the Australian raven. The latter species, as well as other crows such as the Australian crow and Bennett's crow, also feature frequently in reports from Australia. In addition to them, on the Green Continent, the collar hawk Accipiter cirrocephalus, the white-winged jackdaw Corcorax melanorhamphos, the Australian grallina Grallina cyanoleuca, the whistling crow and the variegated flutist crow are becoming adoptive parents.

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