Bird Families

Genus White-eyed - Zosterops

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The eastern white-eyed belongs to the white-eyed family, the passerine order. The appearance of the English and scientific name for the bird is associated with the presence of a noticeable silky silvery-white ring around the eyes. Zosterops translated from Greek means "eye with a belt".

It is a family of small birds, consisting of 85 species, which are distributed mainly in the tropics and subtropics of the Eastern Hemisphere.

Eastern white-eyed (Zosterops palpebrosus).

External signs of an oriental white-eyed

The eastern white-eyed is a small bird about 8-9 cm long with a yellowish-olive upper body, white rings around the eyes, and a yellow throat. The belly is whitish-gray, but may have a yellow tint in some subspecies.

The tail of the bird is greenish, the head is yellow. The wings are rounded, the legs are strong. Outwardly, males and females practically do not differ from each other.

This species includes common subspecies, which are recognized by the color and the degree of presence of shades of yellow in their plumage.

Habitats of the eastern white-eyed

The eastern white-eyed moth lives in mountain forests, inhabits mangroves and gardens. Prefers open landscapes. It is found in a wide range of habitats from shrubs to moist forests, even settling on islands. They are extremely rare in dry desert areas.

The eastern white-eyed is a 12 cm long bird.

Distribution of the eastern white-eyed

The Eastern White-Eye is found over a vast area in Southwest Asia. This bird species is distributed in Afghanistan eastward to China, India, Indonesia. Lives in Australia. In Russia, the white-eyed brown-sided, a close relative of tropical birds, is found.

She lives in the rich in food floodplain forests of the Amur and in the Primorsky Territory. Winters in Indonesia.

Features of the behavior of the eastern white-eyed

Eastern white-eyed can be detected by a sonorous whistle, reminiscent of the cry of a siskin. The birds themselves are completely invisible in dense foliage, and one must look very carefully to see small reddish birds with green backs and sides in the crown of trees.

Along with insects, the eastern white-eye feeds on nectar and various fruits.

Outside the nesting period, eastern white-eyed mites gather in flocks with a number of birds of more than several hundred individuals. Birds usually hide inside the crowns of trees, they collect ants and other insects, and also eat their eggs and larvae. Their silhouettes, with characteristic yellow-green-white tints of plumage, flicker between the branches.

During feeding, the members of the flock constantly call each other, often yelling all together, making a loud noise. Sometimes oriental white-eyed women begin to sing, repeating the same song many times.

Listen to the voice of the eastern white-eyed

Although eastern white-eyed animals do not make long flights, with a favorable wind they are able to reach new territories, including coastal islands.

These birds are quite often included in mixed flocks of small birds of different species and feed in parks, gardens, fields.

Wild populations of this species were captured by reproducing voice signals and using live baits. Eastern white-eyed birds do not stand on ceremony with birds that have settled nearby, and sometimes steal building material from the nests of other birds. There are known cases of interspecific feeding of paradise flycatcher chicks by white-eyed

Reproduction of the eastern white-eyed

The breeding season for eastern white-eyed moths lasts from February to September, but peaks in April.

The male announces the occupied territory with his singing. Both birds build a nest in the form of a compact deep bowl suspended like in a hammock at a fork in a tree, in bushes or on bamboo stalks. It takes 4 days to set it up. Moss, spider webs, lichens and plant fibers are used as building materials.

Wild populations of this species were found even in California in the 1980s.

The female lays two to four pale blue eggs for several days, one after the other. The eggs hatch for about two weeks. Both birds feed offspring, which fledge after 10 days. Chicks are fed with insects. After two weeks, the chicks leave the nest and the parents re-lay their eggs in the same nest.

Nutrition of the eastern white-eyed

Eastern white-eyed birds are mainly insectivorous birds. Along with insects, they feed on nectar and various fruits and seeds.

Keeping eastern white-eyed in captivity

The Eastern White-Eye is a very popular captive breeding bird. Fans of this type of nectar beetle of Asian origin are happy to keep birds in cages.

White-eyed women adhere to a certain diet. They are fed with sweet juice, pieces of fruit, small invertebrates and special food for nectar beetles.

Eastern white-eyed women love to swim in water, so they give liquid food to birds in a sealed container, otherwise the birds can swim in sweet juice. They breed well in captivity.

During the breeding season, the male sings soft cheerful trills, and the female collects building material for building a nest: cobwebs, pieces of plant debris. There are 2-4 eggs in a clutch. The incubation period is 12 days. The chicks remain in the nest for the same amount of time. During the breeding season, eastern white-eyed moths are intensively fed with small live food rich in protein.

The Eastern White-Eye is a very popular captive breeding bird.

The value of eastern white-eyed in ecosystems

Eastern white-eyed white-eyed flowers that visit in search of insects that live on plants, such as thrips, and possibly nectar, which they feed on. At the same time, the head of the eastern white-eyed is often stained with pollen, which leads to errors in identifying the species. Eastern white-eyed moths sometimes bathe in the dew that has gathered on the leaves.

During the nesting period, palm squirrels attack the eastern white-eyed but, despite their small size, the birds defend themselves together. In food chains, white-eyed white-eyed animals serve as food for a variety of predators, including bats and birds of the Kingfisher species. Endoparasites Haemosporidia of the genus Dorisa and Haemoproteus and Dorisa have been found in birds, although they rarely cause death.

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Genus White-Eye - Zosterops

  • White-eyed yellow-billed
    Zosterops luteirostris
  • Eastern white-eye

  • White-eye Kartalinskaya
    Zosterops mouroniensis
  • Japanese white-eyed
    Zosterops japonica
  • White-eyed lordhauskaya
    Zosterops strenua
  • Norfolk white-eyed, or white-throated
    Zosterops albogularis
  • White-eye Mauritian olive
    Zosterops chloronothus (Vieillot, 1817)
  • White-eye Mauritian olive
    Zosterops chloronothus
  • White-eye Seychelles
    Zosterops modestus E. Newton, 1867
  • Norfolk white-eyed, or white-throated
    Zosterops albogularis
  • White-eyed San Tomenskaya, Santomene
    Zosterops ficedulinus
  • White-eye Kartalinskaya
    Zosterops mouroniensis Milne-Edwards et Oustalet, 1885
  • White-eyed santakruskaya (santa-kruskaya)
    Zosterops sanctaecrucis
  • White-eyed San Tomenskaya, Santomene
    Zosterops ficedulinus
  • White-eyed yellow-billed
    Zosterops luteirostris
  • White-eye Seychelles
    Zosterops modestus
  • White-eyed santakruskaya (santa-kruskaya)
    Zosterops sanctaecrucis
  • White-eye Seychelles chestnut-sided
    Zosterops mayottensis semiflavus
  • White-eyed river orange
    Zosterops pallidus
  • Japanese white-eyed
    Zosterops japonica
  • White-eye Seychelles chestnut-sided
    Zosterops mayottensis semiflavus
  • White-eyed lordhauskaya
    Zosterops strenua
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