Bird Families

Birds of Namibia

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viewDune larkCalendulauda erythrochlamysStrickland1853
genusCalendula LarkCalendulaudaBlyth1855
familyLarksAlaudidae
superfamilyPasserinesPasseroidea
infraorderPasserinesPasserida
suborder / suborderSingersOscines
detachment / orderPasserinesPasseriformes
superorder / superorderNew Sky Birds (Typical Birds)NeognathaePycroft1900
infraclassReal birds (Fan-tailed birds)NeornithesGadow1893
subclassCilegrud Birds (Fan-tailed Birds)Carinatae Ornithurae (Neornithes) Ornithurae (Neornithes)Merrem1813
classBirdsAves
superclassFour-leggedTetrapodaBroili1913
subtype / subdivisionVertebrates (Cranial)Vertebrata (Craniata)Cuvier1800
type / departmentChordatesChordata
supertypeCoelomic animalsCoelomata
sectionBilaterally symmetrical (Three-layer)Bilateria (Triploblastica)
suprasectionEumetazoiEumetazoa
subkingdomMulticellular animalsMetazoa
kingdomAnimalsAnimalia
super-kingdomNuclearEukaryotaChatton1925
empireCellular

Interspecific bird conflicts are explained by competition and hybridization

Many animals jealously guard their territory from the invasion of strangers. This is logical when it comes to a representative of its own species. However, an individual belonging to a different species often becomes the object of attack. For a long time, it was believed that such interspecific territoriality was just a by-product of intraspecific territoriality. In other words, the owner attacks the stranger by mistake, mistaking him for a relative.

However, new evidence suggests that protecting an area from other species is adaptive. It can arise and persist when different species compete for a particular resource, such as food or shelter.

A team of zoologists led by Jonathan P. Drury of the University of Durham conducted a massive study of interspecies competition for territory using the example of North American passerines. After analyzing the literature, scientists found that this behavior is typical for 104 of their species. This is 32.3 percent of the total number of passerine species in North America. Thus, interspecies competition is more widespread than previously thought.

According to the authors, in most cases, birds come into conflict over territory with a representative of one specific species. There are several factors that increase the chances of forming a pair of competing species. For example, birds that live in the same biotope, have similar sizes and nest in hollows are more likely to be involved in conflicts over territory. For species belonging to the same family, another factor plays an important role - the probability of hybridization. If two species are capable of interbreeding with each other, their males are likely to react aggressively to each other.

Based on the data obtained, the researchers concluded that interspecific conflicts for territory among birds do not arise by mistake. This behavior is an adaptive response to competition for a limited resource, as well as a mechanism to prevent hybridization between closely related species.

See also other dictionaries:

Erythrochlamys - ID 33020 Symbol Key ERYTH7 Common Name erythrochlamys Family Lamiaceae Category Dicot Division Magnoliophyta US Nativity N / A US / NA Plant Yes State Distribution N / A Growth Habit N / A… USDA Plant Characteristics

Erythrochlamys Guerke - Symbol ERYTH7 Common Name erythrochlamys Botanical Family Lamiaceae ... Scientific plant list

Erythrochlamys spectabilis - ID 33021 Symbol Key ERSP19 Common Name N / A Family Lamiaceae Category Dicot Division Magnoliophyta US Nativity Cultivated, or not in the U.S. US / NA Plant Yes State Distribution N / A Growth Habit N / A… USDA Plant Characteristics

Erythrochlamys spectabilis Guerke - Symbol ERSP19 Botanical Family Lamiaceae ... Scientific plant list

Megaskepasma erythrochlamys - Megaskepasma erythrochlamys ... Wikipédia en Français

Megaskepasma erythrochlamys - Megaskepasma erythrochlamys ... Wikipédia en Français

Megaskepasma erythrochlamys - ID 52462 Symbol Key MEER6 Common Name Brazilian red cloak Family Acanthaceae Category Dicot Division Magnoliophyta US Nativity Cultivated, or not in the U.S. US / NA Plant Yes State Distribution N / A Growth Habit N / A… USDA Plant Characteristics

Calendulauda erythrochlamys - kopinė kalendulauda statusas T sritis zoologija | vardynas atitikmenys: lot. Calendulauda erythrochlamys angl. dune lark vok. Rotdünenlerche, f pranc. alouette a dos roux, f ryšiai: platesnis terminas - kalendulaudos ... Paukščių pavadinimų žodynas

Megaskepasma erythrochlamys Lindau - Symbol MEER6 Common Name Brazilian red cloak Botanical Family Acanthaceae ... Scientific plant list

Megaskepasma - erythrochlamys Megaskepasma erythrochlamys ... Wikipédia en Français

Dune lark - Conservation status Least Concern (IUCN 3.1) Scientific classification Kingdom… Wikipedia

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    Namibia is largely the dry country with the lowest rainfall in sub-Saharan Africa. However, the country still maintains an outstanding variety of birds in its desert and semi-desert habitats. Namibia supports 645 bird species, of which 14 are endemic. Namibia's constitutions allow for the conservation of the natural environment, ecosystems and biological diversity within the country. This national policy is reinforced by the international ones adopted by Namibia.

    Dune Lark (Calendulauda erythrochlamys)

    The Dune Lark is a bird species endemic to Namibian subtropical and tropical arid lowland meadows. The upper parts are sandy-red, and the lower ones are whitish with veins. Their plain face has a whitish eyebrow and a dark brown stripe. The Skylark is found only in the thin-leaved dunes of the Namib Desert, in pairs and small groups of several individuals. Invertebrates and seeds make up a large part of the Dune Lark diet. Breeding takes place during the year following rain, when females lay one or two eggs, which are incubated for about two weeks. Juveniles leave the nest after a 14-day nesting period, after which they learn to fly. The bird has no immediate threats due to its adaptability to desert conditions.

    Francolin Hartlauba (Calendulauda erythrochlamys)

    Francolin is endemic to Namibia and is found only in the northern central and northwestern regions of the country. It has been listed as the least dangerous species. Future threats that could affect the population of the species are related to the extraction of granite from the habitats of Francolin. Francolin is found primarily in semi-arid and arid regions. Their diet mainly consists of insects, worms, and seeds.

    Bustard Rueppell (Eupodotis rueppellii)

    The bustard is a sedentary bird native to Namibia, found in the semi-deserts of Namibia and Angola. It has a gray head and neck and a brownish-sandy body with sandy to tan-colored legs. Bustard Ruppella has been listed as the least problematic species due to its wide range with a stable population trend. The bustard's diet consists of insects, termites, seeds, plant matter, and small reptiles.

    Peach-faced lovebird (Agapornis roseicollis)

    The peach-faced love bird is a small parrot. The parrot feeds seeds and berries in social groups throughout the day, as well as agricultural products such as millet. The bird has a green body with a blue ramp, horny pad, gray legs and feet, and a pink-red face and throat. The bird is threatened by its capture by people for animal trafficking.

    Nature of namibian birds

    Most of the birds in Namibia are highly adapted to the country's arid and semi-arid conditions, either through migration in harsh conditions or through the development of adaptive characteristics. Other birds in Namibia include the Kalao Montero, Barlow and Gray's larks, Herero's chat, the bare-cheeked chatterbox, carp tit, white-tailed screech, steed, Benguela's long-tailed lark, Damara's red-bearded crucian, and Ruppell's parrot.

    What birds are native to Namibia?

    Among the more than 700 known native bird species in Namibia, the dune lark is nowhere else on earth. Other bird species include Francolin Hartlaub, Bustard Ruppella, and the peach-faced Lovebird.

    Dune Lark (Calendulauda erythrochlamys)

    The Dune Lark is a bird species endemic to the Namibian subtropical and tropical dry lowland grasslands. Their plain face has a whitish eyebrow and a dark brown eye stripe. The lark is found in thinly vegetated dunes of the Namib Desert alone, in pairs, and small groups of a few individuals. Invertebrates and seeds make up most of the Dune Lark's diet. Breeding occurs throughout the year after it rains with the females laying one or two eggs which are incubated for about two weeks. Juveniles leave the nest after a nesting period of 14 days after which they learn to fly. The bird has no immediate threats due to its adaptability to desert conditions.

    Hartlaub's Francolin (Calendulauda erythrochlamys)

    The francolin is endemic to Namibia and is only found in the north central and northwestern regions of the country. It has been listed as a least concern species. Future threats likely to affect the population of the species are the mining operations of granite from the habitats of the francolin. The francolin is found mainly in semi-arid to arid regions. Their diet primarily consists of insects, worms, and seeds.

    Ruppell's bustard (Eupodotis rueppellii)

    The bustard is a sedentary bird native to Namibia occurring in the semi-deserts of Namibia and Angola. It has a gray head and neck, and a sandy brown body with sandy to yellow-brown legs. The Ruppell's bustard has been listed as a least concern species due to its wide range with a stable population trend. The diet of the bustard consists of insects, termites, seeds, vegetable matter and small reptiles.

    Peach-faced lovebird (Agapornis roseicollis)

    The peach faced love bird is a small least concern parrot. The parrot forages throughout the day in social groups for seeds and berries and agricultural food such as millet. The bird has a green colored body with a blue ramp, horn-colored bill, gray legs and feet and pink to red face and throat. The bird is threatened by its capture by humans for the pet trade.

    Nature of namibian birds

    Most of the birds in Namibia are highly adapted to the arid and semi-arid conditions of the country either through migration during harsh conditions or development of adaptation features. Other birds in Namibia include Montero’s hornbill, Barlow’s and Grey’s larks, Herero chat, bare-cheeked babbler, carp’s tit, white-tailed shrike, rock runner, Benguela long-billed lark, Damara red-billed hornbill and the Ruppell’s parrot.

    Usage Information

    Photo "White bird perches on desert vegetation, yellow dune in the background, wildlife in Namibia. Calendulauda erythrochlamys, Lark Dune, lives in the sand dunes of the Namib desert, completely endemic" can be used for personal and commercial purposes according to the conditions of the purchased Royalty- free licenses. The image is available for download in high quality with resolution up to 4763x3175.

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