Bird Families

Great Albatross Facts with Large Wingspan

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The great albatross is a marine bird of the genus Diomedea in the Albatross family. The Diomedea genus formerly included all albatrosses, excluding sooty albatrosses. The great albatrosses themselves constitute two species of complexes, the wandering and the Amsterdam albatrosses and the royal albatrosses. The division of six or seven species by the great has been adopted by most authorities, though not all authorities are

Description

Walking albatrosses and southern royal albatrosses are the largest and largest flying birds among albatrosses. They have the largest wings of any bird, from tip to tip, up to 3.5 meters (11 feet), though the average is more than 3 meters (9.8 feet). Large adult males of these two species can weigh more than 11 kg (24 lbs), as heavy as a large swan.

Facial features

The Great albatross is predominantly white in the elderly, the birds white with age. Two royal albatrosses and larger, older male wandering albatrosses are completely white-bodied, whereas adult females and other species have dark penciling marks on the edges of the feathers. Usually small breeds or subspecies and teenagers have a dark brown color. The recently discovered Amsterdam albatross holds the adult age of the dark brown color of the young bird.

Habitat and range

The great continent extends from the Atlantic Ocean (South Georgia and Tristan da Cunha) to the Indian Ocean and New Zealand to the Subantractic Islands, from the Atlantic Ocean (South Georgia and Tristan da Cunha), across the Southern Ocean and to the Great Ocean Islands. The royal albatrosses only nest on New Zealand's subantric islands and there is an unusual colony on the Otago Peninsula in New Zealand.

The waved albatross, the snowy albatross, the white-winged albatross, or the genus (Diomidia exculus), is a large sea bird of the Diomedeidae family, with a circopolar range in the southern ocean. It was the last species of albatross described, and has long been considered as an equal species of Tristan albatross and antipodean albatross.

Some authors still consider them all subspecies of the same species. There is a proposal on the SSC's table to split this species and BirdLife International has already split it. Together with the Amsterdam albatross, it forms a complex of rotating albatross species. Albatross, one of the two largest members of the genus Diomeidia (Great Albatrosis), resembles the size of the southern royal albatross.

It is one of the largest birds in the world and has the most known wings of any living bird, and is one of the most known and studied species of birds in the world. It is a bird located at a great distance. Some individual traveling albatrosses are known to cover more than 125,000 kilometers (, 000,000 miles) three times a year in the Southern Ocean.

Description

Great albatross is predominantly white in the elderly, the birds white with age. Two royal albatrosses and larger, older male wandering albatrosses are completely white-bodied, whereas adult females and other species have dark penciling marks on the edges of the feathers.

Usually small breeds or subspecies and teenagers have a dark brown color. The recently discovered Amsterdam albatross holds the adult age of the dark brown color of the young bird.

Great albatross facts

Name: albatross touring, snowy albatross, white winged albatross (Diomedea acculence)

Length: up to 135 cm.

Weight: 6 to 12 kg.

Location: All oceans except the North Atlantic.

Reservation status: damaged.

Diet: Cephalopods, small fish, crustaceans.

Appearance: Gray-black winged white, disconnected bill

The Wandering Albatross is the largest member of its genus (Diomedia) and is one of the largest birds in the world.

Great albatrosses are one of the most known and most studied species of birds.

Diomedeia refers to Diomedes, a hero of Greek mythology; Of all the Achaeans he and Ajax were second to Achilles skillfully. In Purana all his companions became birds. Exulans Latin language “exile” or “stray.”

Great albatrosses have the largest wings of any bird in the world today, extending up to 3.5 meters in length.

Great albatrosses are great gliders - they can rise in the sky for several hours at a time without wings. They are so efficient at flying that they can use less energy than the wind when sitting at home.

Great albatross has a special gland on the nasal passages that excretes a superior saline solution. It fights off all the salt water they take in, helping them to retain the salt levels in their body.

The wider the albatrosses are, the more white they are.

How is albatrosses swirling?

The rotating albatrosses make a shallow dive while hunting. They will try to eat anything that comes across and the ships will follow, hoping to feed into its garbage. They are so deficient in themselves that they are unable to fly and simply float in the water.

How fast does a flying albatrosses fly?

Walking albatrosses can fly up to 40 km per hour.

What are the rotating albatross mating rituals?

Rotating albatrosses mature sexually by the age of 11.

At the audition, the male traveling albatross will spread his wings, wave the head around the head and rap his bills against the woman while making a faint noise.

The pair will breed for every 2 years, mate for life. The mixing season begins in early November with the creation of mud and grass nests on one of the Albatrosses sub-Antarctic islands.

The female will lay 1 egg about 10 cm long, sometime in mid-December and early January. Incubation takes about 11 weeks, with parents taking turns.

After the chick is born, adults switch between hunting and lodging to take care of the raft. The victim's parents returned to recover the stomach oil to feed the chicken babies. Eventually both parents will start hunting at the same time, visiting the rafters at wide intervals.

How much do you find in Albatrosses?

Waved albatrosses can live for more than 50 years.

How many traveling albatrosses are there today?

There are about 25.200 adult wandering albatrosses in the world today.

Are there any natural predators of stray albatrosses ?

Because they are so large and spend almost the entire time of their lives on the plane, there are almost no natural predators near wandering albatrosses.

Watch the video: Largest Bird in The World (March 2021).

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